How to Grow Bell Pepper Plants Indoors

In this article we learn How to Grow Bell Pepper Plants Indoors. You probably eat Bell peppers quite often. It’s a common house food ingredient. We all use peppers for our cooking and now you can grow them on your own. Growing bell pepper plants can be easy and fun for the whole family. As a kid I did not like bell peppers, but growing them on my own made me like peppers. The next time you need peppers to cook with, you can just pluck them from your homegrown bell pepper plant; talk about fresh.

Grow Bell Peppers at Home


How to grow Bell Peppers

Bell peppers are usually grown 2 months before the winter or frost date. But I grow my bell peppers entirely indoors, as long as I can get some sunlight. The temperature of my home never gets too cold. 

  • Grow bell peppers from seed. You can also buy ready specimens for transplanting but bell peppers are relatively easy to grow from seed. Some varieties of bell pepper can take as little as two months and some others can take three months before they begin to flower. 
  • Bell pepper plants should be planted about two months before the winter. You can start your bell pepper plant indoors. 
  • Plant the seeds in a light layer of soil. Water them regularly and the seedlings should appear in a week or two. 
  • Temperature is very important for bell peppers. The seeds need to be warm enough, they need to have a warm period in order to germinate. Temperatures of over 80° Fahrenheit (26.6° Celsius) is recommended for a good result. Also, you should note that too low temperatures below 55° Fahrenheit (12.7° Celcius) is no good either. You can use grow lights at home if you do not get enough sunlight indoors.
  • If you cant get the right temperature and the seeds don’t sprout, you can make use of a heating mat
  • Seedlings grown indoors need strong light or they will grow tall and spindly. Bad growth at an early stage will lead to floppy transplants. Bell peppers are quite heavy and the plant needs to be strong. If you do get weak growth you can use bamboo or wood skewers and tie them in place.
  • Don’t grow them in too small pots and mix good fertilizer with the soil.
How to Grow Bell Pepper Plants Indoors.
Growing bell pepper plants

Caring for Bell Peppers

  • Fertilize your plant with good fertilizer. However, cut back or avoid nitrogen fertilizer as they are known to help the growth of lush and fruitless plants. 
  • Wait for bell peppers to ripen. Most people make this mistake. Most bell peppers start off with a green color and in two weeks they turn into the desired color. Some varieties may take longer for the right color to develop.
  • Protect your plant from a sudden drop in temperature. You can take a milk jar, cut the bottom and place it on your plant.
  • Save pepper seeds. The pepper seeds can be kept for about two years.
  • Once your peppers are ripe with the right color you can harvest them. The plant won’t grow peppers again and they can be binned in the compost. If you see your plant is diseased or not looking right you can leave it with all the other trash so as not to spread any plant diseases.
Salad Basket with bell peppers
Salad Basket with bell peppers

Now you don’t need to go shop and look for those “organic” non-chemical, pesticide-free bell peppers. You have fresh grown bell peppers right in your home. When you have friends or family visiting cook up a salad right in front of them, and pick those peppers fresh from your plant. Your friends and family will be amazed. Below is a video on how to grow bell peppers plants indoors. Also check our articles on growing potatoes, tomatoes and starting your own vegetable garden at home.

Growing Bell Pepper plants at home
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12 thoughts on “How to Grow Bell Pepper Plants Indoors

  1. Lee says:

    Wow I never realised how easy it is to grow these yourself and how fast they grow. I always add peppers as an ingredient to our stir frys, fajitas etc. I think I would certainly benefit from growing my very own fresh bell peppers. Thank you for this information.

    • Aaron Pereira says:

      Will post more, Its amazing isnt it? Sometimes when i need to cook and i need certain vegetables i have them home grown and pluck them straight out of the plant. Healthy eating at its maximum.

  2. Cathy says:

    You make is sound so easy and tasty! I love having bell peppers in salads, on pizzas, and they’re good stuffed with rice and burger, too. Thanks for giving me a craving. Maybe I’ll buy one bell pepper and plant the seeds inside to see what happens. Thanks for the idea!

    • Aaron Pereira says:

      Hey, you will be so amazed when they start growing. Follow my instagram if u have one , I’ve been posting 2 sec videos and photos of bell peppers i am currently growing at home. They are currently going thru a transition phase where they are green but turning red. They look amazing. There is a instagram logo down below or clink this link
      https://www.instagram.com/homecactus1/

  3. Will says:

    Currently growing my own veggies and have always wanted to grow bell peppers, they are SO expensive to buy at the supermarket.

    This will allow me to have a go ! Thanks for writing such an in depth guide, bookmarking it for future reference.

    All the best

    -Will

  4. Fred Ota says:

    One of my favorite veggies besides tomatoes is the pepper. I live in the south pacific and have plenty of sunshine and some rain. I have grown tomatoes, pak choi, and pumpkin partly because its a hobby and I like fresh veggies. I have not grown pepper yet so I’ll give it try.
    I agree with your idea of growing your own vegetables, including indoors, because a lot of vegetables we buy from the market were exposed to pesticides and other chemicals.
    Keep posting more great articles.
    Fred

  5. James says:

    Nice and simple! Thanks for this information, I appreciate that it’s well presented, step-by-step. We tried to grow some bell peppers earlier this year in the garden using seeds from store-bought peppers, but they didn’t grow too well and produced no fruit worth picking.
    I suspect that a fertiliser should have been used, and perhaps a lower nitrogen soil (?).
    Here’s to next year!

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